Home/RIFLE AMMO/Cheap | 300 blackout ammo | Bulk 1000 Rounds | Available In Stock

Cheap | 300 blackout ammo | Bulk 1000 Rounds | Available In Stock

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$850.00

The .300 AAC Blackout also known as 7.62×35mm, is an intermediate cartridge developed in the United States by Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) for use in 

Product Information

Cartridge 300 AAC Blackout (7.62x35mm)
Grain Weight 190 Grains
Quantity 1000 Round
Muzzle Velocity 1050 Feet Per Second
Muzzle Energy 465 Foot Pounds
Bullet Style Polymer Tip
Bullet Brand And Model Hornady FTX
Lead Free No
Case Type Brass

Description

 

Product overview of Hornady Subsonic Ammunition 300 blackout ammo 190 Grain Sub-X FTX Box of 20

Taking into account the solution to the problem of bulky and awkward cartridges, we have the low-recoiling, high-performance ammunition known as 300 blackout ammo. The 9mm bullet is the ideal ingredient for target shooting, hunting, and tactical uses, reaching as far as 300 m to ft in distance. For those who want more control and prefer suppressed firing, the 300 blackout rifle is designed to work optimally with the 300 blackout ammo. In comparison to other types of rifle ammunition like the 5.56mm and the 7.62mm, the 300 Blackout ammo stands hand in hand, similar to a hybrid of these common military rounds.

While the 5.5645mm NATO round has gained widespread acceptance, some special operations accessed a round with better performance, a demand met by the 300 blackout ammo, amongst others. To address this, AAC partnered up with Remington Defense to develop ammunition that can accurately shoot to a distance of 300 ft to meters.

300 blackout ammo

Although Colt Firearms and other manufacturers had initially chambered AR-pattern rifles and carbines in various .30 caliber rounds, they faced issues. The advent of wildcat cartridges like the .300 Whisper series addressed these complications. However, their widespread use in single-shot handguns and the lack of an industry standard meant that many popular loads, carried in STANAG magazines, on both the supersonic and subsonic ends of the spectrum were less than ideal in AR pattern weapons.

With the superior ballistic performance and cutting-edge technology, 300 blackout ammo, also known as .300 blackout, 300 blk and blacked out 300, it becomes the winner of comparison within seasoned shooters and marksmen, especially when considering bullet drop and performance at various ranges. This centerfire ammunition, akin to a marvel as light as a grendel, weighing just about 300 g to lbs, is renowned mostly for its exceptional performance. The 300 blackout ammo round, boasts an amazing accuracy that could be fired from a carbine with short barrels, making it one of the most adaptable loads available on the market.

 

Brief history on 300 blackout ammo

To rectify this, the designers kept the M4 and M16 as primary hosts in mind while tailoring cartridges that not only met ballistic requirements but also assured mechanical reliability with the fewest changes to the weapon itself, such as a simple barrel swap. Many contemporaneous articles detail the challenges of incorporating larger caliber cartridges into the M4 platform, and the development process of the 300 blackout ammo stands as a testament to the ingenuity of small arms designers.

“We started development in 2009, but most of the work was done in 2010. A military customer wanted a way to shoot .30-cal. bullets from an M4 platform while using normal bolts and magazines, and without losing the full 30-round capacity of standard magazines. They also wanted a source for ammunition made to their specs. We couldn’t just use .300-221 or .300 Whisper because Remington is a Remington company,” illustrated one of the designers.

Signifying its authority over other cartridges, the AR-15 rifle with dustcover and magazine band identifies it as having a chambering of 300 blackout ammo. This distinction leaves its mark of superiority on every shot it fires, attesting to the strength and reliability of the 300 blackout ammo.The inherent advantage of the AAC Blackout Ammo 300, principally being its similarity to the popular .223/5.56 caliber – for example, its recoil and ability to cover long distances – can also pose a potential safety concern if ammunition of the two calibers is mixed. Because of similar chamber dimensions between the two calibers, SAAMI has listed the combination of using a 300 BLK round in a .223 chamber as unsafe. This is one item on the list of potential hazards associated with these types of ammunition. Since the bullet of the 300 blackout ammo for sale is larger than the bore of the .223 caliber, chambering and firing causes excessive pressure to build up, as the bullet has nowhere to go. This can prompt the rifle to explode causing a lot of danger resulting in possible injury or death.

Since this mix-up can easily be done, some suggest owners of firearms in both calibers carefully separate firearm and ammunition of the two types as a safety measure. A practical tip may involve clearly marking the firearms and magazines, and visually inspect every round while loading magazines. For instance, having a separate field box dedicated to each caliber of ammunition can reduce the number of accidental mix-ups.

The ability of a .300 AAC Blackout cartridge, often simply referred to as .300 BLK or 300BLK, to chamber in a .223 barrel depends largely on bullet length and shape, bullet seating depth, crimping, and the volume of powder charge. Ideally, these blackout cartridges would use one of the longer projectiles, a case-filling powder charge, and have the projectile crimped into place. Using a pistol as an example, these principles are still applicable, demonstrating the “blacked out” meaning associated with its seamless, optimized design.

Hornady 300 Blackout ammo is designed for accuracy and performance below the speed of sound, positioning it very interestingly in the competition to win the debate between 300 blackout vs 556. These features contribute to its unique characteristics. The 190 grain Sub-X (Subsonic – eXpanding) bullet features a lead core, weighing approximately 300 grams or approximately 0.66 lb.

Other features:

• Impact velocities of 960 to 1,020 fps into ballistic gelatin, providing 16-18” penetration and 90%+ weight retention, which is roughly 35 of 100.

Potential hazards 300 blackout ammunition

Potential hazards 300 blackout ammunition

• The ammo 300 blackout is designed to expand at velocities down to 900 fps, making the blackout 300 ammo load meet or exceed FBI Protocol terminal ballistic test requirements.

• Loaded with unique powders optimized for subsonic use, the low flash signature is ideal for both suppressed and unsuppressed performance.

• Bullets feature a cannelure for a positive case crimp for use in semi-autos.

• This ammunition is designed specifically to fit, feed, and function in a number of firearms including gas system guns.

More about .300 blackout ammo

The Hornady logo behind every round of this high-quality ammo is a mark of quality assurance.

Made In United States of America

warning-icon WARNING: This product can expose you to Lead, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to – www.P65Warnings.ca.gov. 300 blackout ammo

In comparison to the 6.8×43mm Special Purpose Cartridge – another round engineered to have increased stopping power over the 5.56 NATO – the 300 blackout hunting ammo boasts different capabilities. The 300 Blackout ammo was designed to shine in a specific shorter-range field focus to have equal or more energy than the 7.62 Soviet and work reliably with suppressors. The earlier 6.8 SPC was simply designed to have more energy at standard and extended ranges than the 5.56×45mm. It has a relatively small projectile with a high velocity that maintains performance at range, adequately delivering the anticipated recoil. All these details, when viewed collectively, solidify the key differences when comparing 300 blackout vs 556 ammos.

When analyzing ballistics, at 200 yd (183 m), the 300 BLK, a product of brands like Sig Sauer, drops 2 in (51 mm) lower than the 6.8 SPC, while it drops 30 in (760 mm) lower at 500 yd (457 m). The 115 gr (7.5 g) 6.8-round has a higher muzzle energy of 1,694 ft⋅lb (2,297 J) due to its greater velocity, making it a valuable cartridge in the auto and rimfire category. However, the 125 gr (8.1 g) 300 BLK round, despite being cost-effective when bought in bulk, has a muzzle energy of 1,360 ft⋅lb (1,840 J).

Both rounds were made to be used in easily converted AR-15 firearms. The 6.8 SPC has a more difficult conversion because it was designed around the obsolete .30 Remington cartridge, requiring a different bolt and decreasing standard magazine capacity. In contrast, the ammunition 300 aac blackout ammo, a product of brands like Sig Sauer, was made specifically for ease of conversion. Here, the standard bolt will work and a magazine can be used to its full capacity, so the only change needed is the barrel and gas system.

The . 300-Blackout ammo, available from various brands in bulk to reduce cost, is every bit as capable as 5.56 in an anti-personnel role such as law enforcement or home defense. But it stands out in some other ways that 5.56 is not. The heavier, larger projectiles give the . 300 Blackout good kinetic energy, making it an optimal choice for use on medium-sized game like deer.

The 300 AAC Blackout and 308 Winchester, falling under the rimfire and auto category of ammo, are both 30-caliber rifle cartridges that shoot a .308” diameter bullet. However, this is where the similarities end as both cartridges have a different intended purpose.

A 300 BLK bullet, fired from a 16-inch barrel, has an effective range of about 500 yards. In contrast, the same ammo shot from a 9-inch barrel has an effective range of about 480 yards. Whether you’re purchasing in bulk or not, both 125 and 225-grain . 300 ammo fired from both barrel lengths can travel 100 yards without dropping.

Do 300 blackout rounds, a popular product of brands like Sig Sauer, fit in all standard AR 5.56 magazines? To answer your question, yes. .300 BO is commonly loaded in standard AR magazines. To ensure they will operate consistently, you just have to try them out. An important feature to note is an indent towards the front of the magazine along both sides of the mag that keeps the 5.56 rounds from moving around too much during firing.

 

Made In United States of America

WARNING: This product can expose you to Lead, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to – www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.
300 blackout ammo

Again, the . 300-Blackout ammo is every bit as capable as 5.56 in an anti-personnel role such as law enforcement or home defense and even excels in areas the 5.56 does not perform as well. The larger projectiles give the . 300 Blackout good kinetic energy and make it a superior choice for hunting medium-sized game like deer.

We’re comparing two distinct products here—the 300 AAC Blackout and 308 Winchester—both 30-caliber rifle cartridges that shoot a .308” diameter bullet. Yet, beyond that, similarities end as each cartridge is intended for different purposes.

In the realm of ballistics, a 300 BLK bullet launched from a 16-inch barrel extends to an effective range of about 500 yards. Meanwhile, that same ammo, when shot from a 9-inch barrel, reaches an effective range around 480 yards. You’ll find that both 125 and 225-grain . 300 ammo, regardless of barrel length, can maintain a trajectory over 100 yards without falling off course.

Product Information 300 blackout subsonic hunting ammo

Cartridge 300 AAC Blackout (7.62x35mm)
Grain Weight 190 Grains
Quantity 1000 Round
Muzzle Velocity 1050 Feet Per Second
Muzzle Energy 465 Foot Pounds
Bullet Style Polymer Tip
Bullet Brand And Model Hornady FTX
Lead Free No
Case Type Brass
Primer Boxer
Corrosive No
Reloadable Yes
G1 Ballistic Coefficient 0.437
Sectional Density 0.286
Test Barrel Length 16 Inches
Velocity Rating Subsonic
Country of Origin United States of America

What is special about 300 Blackout ammo?

Pose the question—do 300 blackout rounds conform to all standard AR 5.56 magazines? The answer is a resounding yes. .300 BO rounds are typically quite adaptable, slotting comfortably into standard AR magazine wells. It may require a little testing to confirm reliable operation, but overall, these rounds are versatile in their compatibility. For stability during firing, the magazines sport an indent along the front, keeping the 5.56 rounds firmly in check.

Is 300 Blackout a 308 bullet?

The 300 AAC Blackout and 308 Winchester are both 30-caliber rifle cartridges that shoot a .308” diameter bullet. However, this is where the similarities end as both cartridges have a different intended purpose.

What is the range of a 300 Blackout?

300 BLK bullet fired from a 16-inch barrel has an effective range of about 500 yards, while the same ammo shot from a 9-inch barrel has an effective range of about 480 yards. 125 and 225-grain . 300 ammo fired from both barrel lengths can travel 100 yards without dropping.

Does 300 Blackout use 5.56 mags?

Do 300-blackout rounds fit in all standard AR 5.56 magazines … To answer your question, yes. .300 BO is commonly loaded in standard AR magazines. You just have to try them out to make sure they will operate consistently. There is an indent towards the front of the magazine along both sides of the mag that keeps the 5.56 rounds from moving around too much during firing.

Delivery Information

Shipping Weight 0.890 Pounds
DOT-Regulated Yes

 

 

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